Scandinavia 1453 CE

The kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden are all ruled by one monarch.

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What is happening in Scandinavia in 1453CE

In the later 13th century a new force rose to become a power in the Baltic region. This was the Hanseatic League, a collection of trading towns which stretched from Novgorod in the east to London in the west, and was centred on the north German city of Lubeck. Through their co-operation they have risen to dominate the commerce of northern Europe.

Partly in response to challenge posed by the Hanseatic league, the Scandinavian kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, having all experienced political instability in the 14th century, came together in the Union of Kalmar in 1397. By the terms of this union, all three countries choose a single monarch to rule them all, but are otherwise more or less self-governing.

Although each kingdom has a high degree of autonomy, there is constant friction between them, sometimes breaking out into open war.

Next map, Scandinavia in 1648

 

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