Britain 750 CE

A collection of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms now covers most of present-day England, and the rest of the British Isles is home to numerous Celtic tribes and kingdoms.

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What is happening in Britain in 750CE

The Anglo-Saxons established a multitude of small kingdoms in eastern Britain. By around 600 these had coalesced into a small number of larger kingdoms. These kingdoms – Northumbria, Mercia and Wessex – gradually extended their territory westward as they incorporated more and more lands of the Britons.

From the end of the sixth century, the Anglo-Saxons began converting to Christianity. To what extent this religion had survived from Roman times is a matter for debate. What is clear is that the Irish were converted to the new religion in the fifth century, and from the sixth century they began sending missionaries to Scotland (where an Irish tribe, the Scotti, had established a kingdom) and northern England. In 597 a mission sent by the Pope in Rome, led by the monk, Augustine, also appeared in the south of England. A sort of pincer movement led to the Anglo-Saxons receiving missions from north and south, and by the end of the seventh century all of England and Scotland had become Christian. The Synod of Whitby (664) had led to all Christians in England accepting the practices of the Roman church, as was the case in most of western Europe.

Next map, Britain in 979

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