Using the TimeMap of World History with Middle School students

Here is a list of our free and premium resources which can be used in Middle Schools.

The focus here is on our Timemap resources. These are sequences of maps which track the world, regions, countries or (in the case of premium resources) civilizations and key episodes in world history through time.

We have not included encyclopedia articles here, as these are not primarily aimed at middle school students. However, able students might well benefit from reading them. They are all listed at our Timemaps of World History Encyclopedia. 

World Prehistory Resources

As the start date for the Timemap of World History is 3500 BCE, there are no free maps relevant to human history prior to this date. However, there is one Premium resource relevant to this period.

Premium unit:

The Origins and Spread of Farming (PowerPoint unit) + Teachers Notes

A sequence of world maps shows the origins and spread of farming in world history, between c. 10000 BCE and c. 3500 BCE.

Ancient Mesopotamia

Free maps:

Iraq (Ancient Mesopotamia) :

3500 BCE – Ancient Mesopotamia at the time when the first cities were appearing

2500 BCE – Ancient Mesopotamia at the time of the Sumerian civilization

1500 BCE – Ancient Mesopotamia after the time of Hammurabi

1000 BCE – Ancient Mesopotamia in the time of crisis when the Bronze Age was transitioning into the Iron Age

500 BCE – Ancient Mesopotamia at the time of the Persian empire; includes a brief history of peoples and states who had conquered the region in the previous 500 years

For Mesopotamia’s place in the Middle East, the following maps will also be useful:

Middle East 3500 BCE – 2500 BCE – 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE

These cover nations such as the Hittites who lived outside Mesopotamia but had an influence on it.

Premium units:

One premium unit gives the “Big Region” context for the rise and fall of Ancient Mesopotamian civilization. 

The Ancient Middle East + Teachers Notes

It includes episodes not covered by the free maps, such as the Akkadian empire of Sargon, the Babylonian empire of Hammurabi, the Kassite kingdom which came after, and the Assyrian, Chaldean (Later Babylonian) and Persian empires. It also traces the history of the Israelites, whose history was intimately connected to that of Mesopotamia.

There are also three Premium units which place Mesopotamian civilization clearly in the context of world history. These are interesting in that they clearly show the key importance of Ancient Mesopotamia as the cradle of human civilization:

Early Civilizations + Teachers Notes

Early Civilizations Activities (PowerPoint activities) + Teachers Notes

World Trade Routes – Ancient World – Teachers Notes coming soon

Ancient Egypt

Free maps:

Egypt:

3500 BCE – Ancient Egypt in the pre-dynastic period

2500 BCE – Ancient Egypt at the time of the Old Kingdom

1500 BCE – Ancient Egypt just after the founding of the New Kingdom

1000 BCE – Ancient Egypt just after the New Kingdom

500 BCE – Ancient Egypt at the time of the Persian empire; includes a brief history of the late dynastic period.

For Egypt’s place in the Middle East, the following maps will also be useful:

Middle East 3500 BCE – 2500 BCE – 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE

Premium units:

As with the Ancient Mesopotamian topic, one premium unit gives the “Big Region” context for the rise and fall of Ancient Egyptian civilization. 

The Ancient Middle East + Teachers Notes

This clearly shows the changing place of Egypt in the broader Middle Eastern region. It also includes episodes not covered by the free maps, such as the unification of Ancient Egypt in the pre-dynastic period, the rise and fall of the Old Kingdom, of the Middle Kingdom, and of the New Kingdom (including the height of its imperial period, which the free maps don’t show). Finally, it shows Ancient Egypt in decline, with the rise of regional superstates such as the Assyrian and Persian empires.

It also traces the history of the Israelites, whose history was intimately connected to that of Ancient Egypt.

There are also three Premium units which place Ancient Egypt in the context of world history:

Early Civilizations + Teachers Notes

Early Civilizations Activities (PowerPoint activities) + Teachers Notes

World Trade Routes – Ancient World – Teachers Notes coming soon

 

Kush

Free maps:

500 BCE – Ancient Kush (Nubia) in 500 BCE, giving a brief history of the region prior to this date.

For broader context:

Africa 500 BCE

Premium unit:

The Ancient Middle East + Teachers Notes

This Premium unit is useful in including episodes, in particular the period when Kush conquered Egypt, which are not covered in the free maps.

 

Ancient India

Free maps:

For the Indus Civilization and the later Classical Indian Civilization, see:

India and South Asia:

3500 BCE – South Asia before the Indus Valley 

2500 BCE – at the time of the Indus Valley civilization

1500 BCE – the early Vedic period

1000 BCE – the later Vedic period

500 BCE – at the time of the Buddha

200 BCE – at the time of the Mauryan empire

30 BCE – fragmented India

200 CE – fragmented India

500 CE – at the time of the late Gupta empire

Premium units:

Ancient India + Teachers Notes

This is useful in covering episodes not included in the free maps, such as the rise and fall of the Maurya and Gupta empires.

This does not cover the Indus Valley Civilization. This is included in the Premium units:

Early Civilizations + Teachers Notes

Early Civilizations Activities (PowerPoint activities) + Teachers Notes

These place the Indus Valley Civilization and what came after in South Asia in the context of World History.

Also:

World Trade Routes – Ancient World – Teachers Notes coming soon

This is interesting for Ancient India in showing how maritime trade connections gradually linked to SE Asia, the Middle East and Mediterranean, and to East Africa, and overland connections linked it to central Asia and China. These allowed Indian religions such as Hinduism, but more so Buddhism, to spread far from their homeland.

 

Ancient China

Free maps:

For the origins and development of civilization in ancient China, see:

For Ancient China, including the Shang and early Zhou dynasties, see:

China:

2500 BCE – early China

1500 BCE – at the time of the Shang dynasty

1000 BCE – at the time of the early Zhou dynasty

500 BCE – at the time of Confucius

200 BCE – at the start of the Han dynasty

30 BCE – mid-Han China

200 CE – Late Han China

500 CE – China fragmented

For a broader perspective on East Asia, showing the spread of farming and civilization from China to neighbouring countries such as Korea and Japan, see:

East Asia 3500 BCE – 2500 BCE – 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE200 BCE30 BCE200 CE500 CE

Even the world maps are of interest, particularly those showing what a major empire Han China was in the later ancient world:

World 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE

Premium units:

Ancient China + Teachers Notes

This is useful in covering episodes not included in the free maps, such as the Warring States period and the unification of China under the Qin dynasty.

It does not cover the earliest period of Chinese history, the Shang and early Zhou dynasties. These are included in the Premium units:

Early Civilizations + Teachers Notes

Early Civilizations Activities (PowerPoint activities) + Teachers Notes

These place the early China in the context of World History.

Also:

World Trade Routes – Ancient World – Teachers Notes coming soon

This is interesting for Ancient China in showing the development of the famous Silk Road, the overland trade route which linked East Asia with Central Asia, Western Asia and Europe.

 

Ancient Greece and the Greek World

Free maps:

Greece:

1500 BCE – at the time of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations

1000 BCE – in the Dark Ages before the rise of Greek civilization

500 BCE – Classical Greece on the eve of the Greek-Persian Wars

200 BCE – Greece after the time of Alexander the Great

In geographical terms, these maps are limited to the Greek mainland, the Aegean Sea and western Asia Minor – i.e. the heartland of the Greek world.

The Greek diaspora, which took in the Mediterranean and Black Sea coasts, can be seen in:

Europe 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE – 200 BCE

and also

Middle East 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE

Premium units:

Clash of Civilizations: Greece and Persia + Teachers Notes

This follows the major events in the Greek world from just before the Greek-Persian Wars to the fall of the Greek states to Rome. It also looks at the much-neglected (but pivotal) Persian world. It includes the conquests of Alexander the Great and the divisions which followed his early death. 

This unit does not cover the Greek-Persian Wars in any detail, but these have their own one:

The Persian Wars, 499 BCE to 478 BCE (PowerPoint Presentation) + Teachers Notes

Neither of these cover the early centuries of Greek history, but these are included within the Premium units:

Early Civilizations + Teachers Notes

Early Civilizations Activities (PowerPoint activities) + Teachers Notes

These place the Minoans, Mycaeans and early Greeks (and not to forget those very important Phoenicians) in the context of World History.

World Trade Routes – Ancient World – Teachers Notes coming soon

This is interesting for Greek history as it shows how Phoenician and Greek colonization extended maritime trade routes across the length and breadth of the Mediterranean and Black Seas.

 

The Roman world

Free maps:

Italy 500 BCE – 200 BCE

These only cover early Roman history. More useful for looking at the Roman Empire are:

Europe 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE

Middle East 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE

Even the world maps are of interest, particularly those showing what a major state the Roman was in the later ancient world:

The World 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE 

Premium units: 

For an overview of the histry of the Roman empire, the following Premium unit is ideal:

The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire

Teachers Notes

For a closer look at a particular theme of Roman history which has had profound influence on all later Western civilization, look at

Roman Government (PowerPoint Presentation)

Teachers Notes

Also, the Premium unit below shows clearly how the expansion of Roman power was accompanied by the expansion of trade routes. This was the case within the Roman empire; it was also true in Asia, were the Silk Road connected the Mediterranean world of the Romans with China:

World Trade Routes – Ancient World – Teachers Notes coming soon

 

The World of Islam

Free maps:

Middle East 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 145316481789

These maps look only at the Middle East. A Premium unit consisting of a sequence of maps taking in the whole of the Islamic world is planned.

 

African Civilizations

Free maps:

Africa 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 14531648

The region which is the focus of most curriculums is West Africa. For this, go to:

West Africa – 500 CE750979121514531648

 

China (after the Ancient Period)

Free maps:

China 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 145316481789

For the broader region context, showing the connections between China and her neighbours, especially Japan and Korea, see 

East Asia 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 145316481789

 

Japan

Fee maps:

Japan 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 145316481789

For Japan’s history in the context of East Asia as a whole, see

East Asia 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 145316481789

 

India

Free maps:

India and South Asia 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 145316481789

 

Early American civilizations

Free maps:

Central America (for the Maya, Toltec and Aztec civilizations):

Mexico and Central America 3500 BCE – 2500 BCE – 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 1453

For the native American cultures of North America, see:

North America 3500 BCE – 2500 BCE – 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 1453

South America (for the Inca civilization and its predecessors):

Peru: 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 1453

For the broader context of Andean civilization, see:

South America 3500 BCE – 2500 BCE – 1500 BCE – 1000 BCE – 500 BCE – 200 BCE – 30 BCE – 200 CE – 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 1453

 

The Middle Ages in Europe

Free maps:

Europe 500 CE – 750 – 979 – 1215 – 1453

Premium unit:

Europe in the Middle Ages (PowerPoint Presentation) + Teachers Notes

 

The Early Modern World

Free maps:

World:

The early modern world sees the histories of the different regions begin to be knitted together as Europe expands. So a global perspective is necessary, and can be gained here:

World maps for 1453 – 1638 – 1789.

An understanding of the expansion of Europe requires a grasp of what was actually happening IN Europe. This can be seen here:

Europe 1453 – 1648 – 1789

The region that felt the expansion most keenly in this period was the Americas, as can be seen here:

South America, from the end of the Pre-Columbian period through the colonial period:

South America  1453 – 1648 – 1789

For Central America, see:

Mexico and Central America  1453 – 1648 – 1789

For North America, see:

Colonial USA (if that’s not a contradiction in terms) : 1648

Early Canada: 16481789

For North America as a whole, with an emphasis on the Native Americans and how the coming of Europeans impacted their lives, see:

North America 1453 – 1648

Black slavery was a feature of much of colonial America, and the slave trade had a major impact on Africa. See

Africa 1453 – 1648 – 1789

Asia at this time was less directly affected by European expansion, and each of the major regions saw the blossoming of major states. See

Middle East 1453 – 1648 – 1789 (The Ottoman empire)

India and South Asia 1453 – 1648 – 1789 (The Moghul empire)

East Asia 1453 – 1648 – 1789 (The Manchu, or Qing, dynasty of China, and also Tokugawa Japan)

For more close-ups, see China 1453 – 1648 – 1789

and Japan 1453 – 1648 – 1789

For other parts of the world which are not so popular in middle school curricula but are interesting in their own rights, are

South East Asia 1453 – 1648 – 1789

and Oceania  1453 – 16481789

 

The Modern World

Free maps:

The history of the modern world has been global in scope, in a way not true of earlier times. A global perspective is therefore necessary, and can be gained here:

World maps for:   1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 191419602005

Europe

The dominating theme in modern world history up to the 20th century is the accelerating expansion of European power. Then, Europe tore itself apart in two huge wars. This tumultuous history can be seen here:

Europe  1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914  – 19602005

Within in Europe, certain countries repay special attention:

Britain 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914  – 19602005 (the rise of the first parliamentary democracy and the first industrial society)

France 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 19602005 (the French Revolution, Napoleon and after)

Germany 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 19602005  (a new, powerful European state)

Russia 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 19602005 (a giant looming over Europe)

In the 20th century, the United States took over from Europe as the most dynamic region in the world. 

For the United States see:

USA 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 19602005

Other European offshoots also appeared:

Canada 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 19602005

Australia 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 19602005

New Zealand 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 19602005

as well as:

South America 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

Mexico and Central America 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

Much of the world fell under the rule of European empires, before regaining independence in the 20th century:

Africa 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

India and South Asia 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

South East Asia 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

The Pacific 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

Other regions did not come under direct rule, or were ruled only briefly, but were deeply impacted by Western power:

Middle East 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

East Asia 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

including

China 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

and Japan (of the late Tokugawa and Meiji periods) 1789 – 1837 – 1871 – 1914 – 1960 – 2005

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