Venezuela, Colombia and the Guianas 1789 CE

The north-west region of South America has seen much development during the 18th century.

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What is happening in Venezuela, Colombia and the Guianas in 1789CE

The north-west region of South America has developed considerably during the 18th century, a fact recognised by the Spanish government in the establishment of the viceroyalty of New Granada, with its own regional administration. Better administration has led to an expansion in trade and settlement. The population of the region has increased greatly. On the Venezuelan coast, the port of Caracas has become a thriving commercial centre, its prosperity based on the cacao trade. There are also many plantations, worked by black slaves. Throughout present-day Colombia and Venezuela, the traditionally dominant landowning class has been joined by an elite of wealthy merchants from the coastal cities. These enjoy closer-contacts with European thought and culture than any other group in South America.

To the east, the French and Dutch colonies have established a flourishing slave-based plantation economy, on or near the coast. The interior is almost completely undeveloped, the home of the Arawak and Carib Amerindian peoples.

Next map, Venezuela, Colombia and the Guianas in 1837

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