Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay 2005 CE

Argentina has experienced continuing economic upheaval.

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What is happening in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay in 2005CE

The military dictatorships are unable to solve Argentina’s economic problems. Finally, in 1973, Peron’s supporters win power and he returns to the country as President. He dies the following year, to be succeeded in power by his third wife, Isabel. She, however, is in turn unable to deal with the hyper-inflation, and is ousted by the armed forces in 1976. The new military regime kills or imprisons thousands of its opponents, especially its left-wing critics, and then blunders into a humiliating war with Britain over the Malvinas (or Falkland) Islands (1982). This defeat leads to the return of civilian government the following year. However, successive civilian governments have been unable to cure Argentina’s economic ills, leading to a virtual meltdown of the economy in December 2001. Nevertheless, there was no return to military rule, and since 2002 the country has seen a steady economic recovery.

Until recently a stable and prosperous country, Uruguay suffers from economic crisis as its agricultural exports fall in price. This triggers social and political conflict, including guerilla activity, and in 1973 the army steps in to take control of the government. Democracy is restored eleven years later (1984). Since then the country has known cycles of economic growth and decline, but has remained politically stable and wedded to democracy.

Paraguay was ruled by the dictator Alfredo Stroessner, who presided over a period of economic progress until he was toppled in a bloody military coup in 1989. The country became a democracy in 1993 – for the first time in its history.  Since then the country has experienced periods of economic expansion and decline, tied largely to fluctuations in the price of its commodity exports.

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