Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay 1789 CE

This region of South America has assumed much greater importance than before.

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What is happening in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay in 1789CE

The south-east region of South America has assumed much greater importance in the late 18th century. Direct trade with Spain is now permitted, and with the rise of transatlantic trade the fortunes of Buenos Aires and surrounding areas have greatly improved. The city itself is growing dramatically, and has been raised to equal status with Lima and Mexico City as one of the capitals of Spanish America.

Herds of wild horses, whose descendants arrived with the Spaniards two hundred years before, now roam the Pampas of Argentina. These are being rounded up, tamed and used for transport purposes. As a result of this activity there is growing up a class of South American “cowboys” called gauchos – complete with formidable Indian foes, now also riding on horseback.

At this date the southern parts of Argentina, Patagonia, remain almost entirely untouched by Spanish rule.

The Jesuit communities of Paraguay and southern Brazil have now vanished. The Jesuits had aroused the jealousy of the local landowners (who coveted the Indian labour the Jesuits controlled) as well as the Spanish government (who had an eye on the great wealth the order had accumulated). In 1767 the Jesuit order was banished from all Spanish lands. Their communities were handed over to officials, who, either through incompetence or corruption, allowed them to wither away. Their Indian labourers soon found themselves working as serfs on the large landed estates of the region.

Next map, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay in 1837

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